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Books and Videos related to computer history


What's the most stablesafe minidrive USB Flash, SD Card, PCMCIA MicroDrive, other ...I don't want
snip other advice It is very unkind to give wrong advice to unsuspected losers. DF's and RF's were...

Hi all,

History of both computers in general and now the Internet have been an interest of mine since early high school (I'm 28 now), and now that I've worked in the computer industry for about 7 years (most as a web programmer) I'm learning more and more history every day about the technologies we take for granted.

I'd love to see what books, videos, etc other folks have related to this. I really enjoy reading through the Google archives, like searching for info.cern.ch or searching for TRS-80, Macintosh, or Commodore from like 1980-1989. Awesome pieces of history right here.

I'm currently reading Tim Burners-Lee's book Weaving the Web (ISBN: 0062515861), and it's awesome! It's neat to read a chapter about his endeavors then jump on the newsgroups and read the actual articles and discussions that took place.

What's the most stablesafe minidrive USB Flash, SD Card, PCMCIA MicroDrive, other ...I don't want
alt.folklore.computers OP should consider DECtape. Snip the joys of owning fixed head disks Lucky you! If the punch needed fan-fold, at least you had high speed paper tape kit. Try that...

Other books I really enjoy are Cliff Stoll's Cuckoo's Egg (one of my faves), Cyberpunk (ISBN: 0684818620) by Katie Hafner, Hackers (ISBN: 0141000511) by Steven Levy, and many others. I also love books on the histories of the companies, like Apple Confidential 2.0, The Little Kingdom: The Private Story of Apple Computer, and Apple: The Inside Story, which of course cover Apple. There are also equally interesting books on Microsoft, Oracle, and other companies.

As for videos, the Robert X. Cringley series on PBS (Triumph of the Nerds and Nerds 2.0) are both awesome, plus PBS's Nova episode The KGB, The Computer, and Me, and old episodes of Computer Chronicles Pirates of Silicon Valley along with other documentaries from various programs over the years.

I talk to many coworkers and friends who are just as much into computers as I, but most don't seem interested in this at all. They don't have a clue who Tim Burners-Lee, Vint Cerf, Bob Metcalfe, Marc Andresen, Ward Christensen, Tom Jennings, or any of the other folks who created what we have today. They might've heard of Gates and Jobs, or maybe Woz, but that's about it.

What's the most stablesafe minidrive USB Flash, SD Card, PCMCIA MicroDr
Patrick Scheible But I liked the 33 keyboard and got used to its rythm. If...

Am I one of the few Computer guys who actually enjoys computers enough to research their history and where the technology we use today came from? I not only like to know how things work, but also who and why the technology was created.

Just curious. I have a huge library of books and videos I've built over the years about this, and though all this can generally be found online it would be interesting to have more timelines in one place related to this topic. Oh well.. Take care, and thanks for indulging me.

Ringo


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