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Thou shalt have no other gods before the ANSI C standard 1419


Thou shalt have no other gods before the ANSI C standard 1421
Hogwash. If there is capacity, and a redundant route, and they did their networks according to Best Current Practice, we are at most talking about a...
Thou shalt have no other gods before the ANSI C standard 1422
rpl Ok. Security Engineering is one of my favorites for learning the mindset. It isn't going to teach prescriptions for how to build secure stories, and it is mostly a bunch of war...

Has qmail been proven secure? Has it been put through the ringer by some famous targeted attack? Or has it just been put into wide use and not been busted publicly?

The reason I ask, is because I am aware that when anyone shows up in sci.crypt and posts an article to the effect of "we are proud to announce the availability of J. Random Snake Oil Security Solution, and to prove it is secure, we offer a reward to anyone that can break it. If nobody can break it, then it is obviously super good stuff and everybody should use it."

Thou shalt have no other gods before the ANSI C standard 1420
Douglas A. Gwyn I do appreciate that you speak up, and I hope you will...

NORMALLYwhen that happens, the flood gates open up and everybody cries BS and points out that that just because it hasn't been broken doesn't make it secure, unless it has been proven to be secure or has stood some mightily impressive targeted attacks by the pros from Dover.

Maybe that only applies to encryption s-w, not other applications that claim immunity from certain clbuttes of security attacks, but not others (such as DOS).

For some reason, qmail gets a pbutt from the usual sci.crypt on this, or perhaps somebody respected for such attacks went after it and admitted they couldn't break it and I just missed it.

There is a much larger body of software that has not been broken or had published security vulnerabilities than that which has, even on Windows. Since the author of qmail doesn't take responsibility for bugs in the OS, then I don't see why windows developers get a bad rap if Microsoft has a security hole. Fair is fair.

-- Randy Howard (2reply remove FOOBAR) "Making it hard to do stupid things often makes it hard to do smart ones too." -- Andrew Koenig


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Thou shalt have no other gods before the ANSI C standard 1420

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Thou shalt have no other gods before the ANSI C standard 1418